DJ Wild Poker – Now There’s a Casino Table Game That Offers All Deuces and a Joker As Wild Cards

DJ Wild (Deuces, Joker) Poker is a casino table game where players play against a house dealer. The objective of course is for the player to have a higher poker hand than the dealer in order to win.

The game is played with a standard 52 card deck plus one Joker. The unique offering is that the four Deuces and the one Joker serve as wild cards, which can be substituted for any card to improve the hand.

How DJ Wild Poker is Played

Players must first make (2) equal bets in the Ante and Blind positions. An optional Trips wager is also available which pays if won even if the player loses the hand to the dealer.

Each player and dealer receive five cards face down.After reviewing the cards, the player makes one of two choices: (1) Fold, forfeiting the Ante and Blind wagers. (2) Make a Play bet at 2X the Ante. The player then tucks the played cards face down under the wager.

The dealer will then reveal his or her cards, and in turn will compare the hand to the players’ hands that made the Play wager.

If the dealer beats the player, the ante, Blind, and Play bets lose. If the dealer and player tie, the Ante, Blind, and Play bets push. If the player beats the dealer, the Ante and Play bets pay even money, and the Blind bet pays according to the following table:

Hand Payout

Five Wilds. 1000/1

Royal Flush 50/1

Five of a Kind 10/1

Straight Flush. 9/1

Four of a Kind 4/1

Full House 3/1

Flush 2/1

Straight 1/1

All Other Push

Optional Trips Bet

The Winning Trips wager pays according to the poker value of the player’s hand providing the player has at least 3 of a Kind. There are two separate pay tables, one without and one with wild cards. Payout amounts may vary between jurisdictions. Here is a common table:

Natural

Royal Flush – 1000/1

Straight Flush – 200/1

Four of a Kind – 90/1.

Full House – 40/1

Flush – 25/1

Straight – 20/1

Three of a Kind – 6/1

Wild

Five Wilds – 2000/1

Royal Flush – 100/1

Five of a Kind – 100/1

Straight Flush – 30/1

Four of a Kind – 6/1

Full House – 5/1

Flush – 4/1

Straight – 3/1

Three of a Kind – 1/1

Another optional upgrade wager that’s available in some jurisdictions is the Two Way Bad Beat. (A bad beat is when you get beat and get paid.) In this option the player must have Three of a Kind or better without a tie. If the player loses to the dealer. The pay table pays the following:

Royal Flush – 10,000/1

Five of a Kind – 10/000/1

Straight Flush – 5,000/1

Four of a Kind – 500/1

Full House – 400/1

Flush – 300/1

Straight – 100/1

Three of a Kind – 9/1

Strategy and House Edge

Strategy for this game is to raise with any pair of 4’s or better, otherwise fold. The house edge is calculated at about 3.5%.

The Rich History of Playing Cards

Playing cards have been a source of amusement and game playing fun for centuries. For hundreds of years people have been playing them for fun, gambling with them and even fortune telling with them! They are a truly international and universally known and acknowledged game. With literally hundreds of variations of games that can be played and enjoyed any number of players from one individual to a group. What are your favourite card games to play? There’s no doubt you can think of one straight way, in fact, you may know may card games you enjoy.

The history of card games is rich and varied and illustrates how versatile this old game really is.

Let’s look at the deck of cards first. A deck or pack is made up of 52 playing cards. They are made up of four suits, Clubs, Hearts, Diamonds and Spades. Each suit is made up of numbered and face cards, the numbers run from Ace through to 10, and then the face cards are Jack, Queen and King. In most games, the Ace value can be counted as high or low depending upon the game rules. For example, in Poker and Black Jack the Aces are high.

On the back of the cards is usually a design or custom image, this depends upon who has had the cards printed. Companies and casinos have their own customer designs done. There are also traditional ornate card designs and colours which are usually red, blue or black. There is also a wide variety of designs and themes for the suits. Even well-known film franchises like Star Wars and Marvel comics have created their own playing card suits.

Over the year literally hundreds of games have been created and passed down through generations. The traditional card games are all still played, like Poker as previously mentioned. But there are also fun games like Solitaire, Hearts, Go-fish, Trumps and more.

For years cards have been used to tell fortunes. Fortune tellers use the suits and the cards are they are dealt out to give the questioner a glimpse into their futures. Whether you believe in this or not, there is no doubt that it is an art in itself and something that is still popular with many people today.

It is believed that the four suits represent the four season of the year, and that each card a day. When you had the cards up they do come to 365 which is the total number of days in the year. There are many little facts like this that add to the interest and mystery of playing cards and how they came about so many hundreds of years ago.

The next time you pick up a pack of cards and start to play think about how historical they really are. Many books have been published on this subject and for many it has become and hobby and passion. In auction houses around the world the oldest packs in perfect condition go for literally thousands of dollars and more. The older they are, and if all cards are present, they can fetch huge sums of money.

The Genesis and Evolution of Playing Cards: Where Did the Cards Come From?

So where did playing cards come from?

Most of us had our first cards come from Mom and Dad. As toddlers, a used deck kept us busy and out of their hair. Soon we graduated to Go Fish and War, (with cards that had torn corners, daubs of chocolate, and a little peanut butter.) Then as teens we went on to penny poker. We learned how to play and we played to win. As adults we’re still playing cards, be it sociable games with our friends or a little Blackjack, Poker, or Baccarat at the casino.

Earliest History of Playing Cards

The earliest known history of where cards came from dates back to ancient China, where it is believed that they were invented during the 9th century. Some historians suggest that the first cards may have been actual currencies that were used for games of chance. The money cards had four suits: coins, strings of coins, myriads, and tens of myriads. A myriad is a group, lot, or heap of currency. (One myriad equals 10,000 units.) By the 11th century the popularity of the playing card spread to the entire Asian continent.

European Design Changes

Cards first appeared in Europe around 1377. By this time a single deck contained 52 cards comprised of four suits: polo sticks, coins, swords, and cups. Each suit contained ten spot cards. The value of each card was determined by the number of suit symbols on each card. Each suit also had three court cards named; King, Deputy King, and Under Deputy King.

In 15th century Europe the suits of the cards varied from country to country until France invented the four suits which are now the most common: spades, hearts, diamonds, and clubs. It is widely believed that each of the four suits stood for one part of society. Spades represent the nobility of the knights, (the pointed tip signifies a spear.) Hearts stood for the clergy, Diamonds for merchants, and Clubs for peasants. The Europeans also changed the court card designs to represent European royalty: King, Queen, and Knave, who is the son of the King and Queen, or the Prince. Today the Knave is known as the Jack.

Playing Cards in America

Cards first came to America with Columbus in 1492. When the Puritans colonized Massachusetts Bay in the 1600’s’ they outlawed the possession of cards because of their hostility towards games of chance. Nevertheless, card playing prevailed in other colonies and was considered a suitable form of entertainment. As the country expanded, taverns, road houses, and Mississippi riverboats flourished with card playing gamblers and sharks. Pioneers brought their cards with them to California during the gold rush.

America stayed with the European design; however, after the civil war the American card companies added two Jokers to each deck to promote a popular trump card game called Euchre, though the jokers never gained widespread popularity. Today very few card games use the joker. Among them are Canasta, Crazy Eights, and the casino game of Pai Gow Poker, Where the joker is a wild card.

Presently there are over nine hundred card games that use the standard 15th century French deck. Almost every household in the developed world has at least one deck of cards, but a typical casino may use up to twenty-five thousand decks in one month. Because skill is required for casino card games, our interest in them will not change anytime soon.